ISPR Presence News

Monthly Archives: March 2011

Call: Ethnographic Fiction & Speculative Design Workshop

Call for Papers: Ethnographic Fiction & Speculative Design Workshop

http://www.designculturelab.org/ethnographic-fiction-speculative-design-workshop-cfp/

Ethnographic Fiction and Speculative Design is a full-day workshop at the 5th International Conference on Communities & Technologies–C&T 2011, in Brisbane, Australia, 29 June-2 July, 2011.

Position papers are due 1 April, 2011.
Please email submissions to speculativedesign@gmail.com.

Introduction

While pervasive technology development and implementation proceed apace, the potential social and cultural implications – including the ways in which end user communities can be active participants in these processes – remain underexplored. The inherent invisibility of the technological infrastructure required to support these emerging networks makes it difficult to identify which objects around us might have computational capacities, or what those capacities might be. Without that sort of tangible knowledge, it is also difficult to imagine how such networks stand to reconfigure individual identities and social interactions, or how access, data privacy and ownership might be managed.… read more. “Call: Ethnographic Fiction & Speculative Design Workshop”

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In Japan, rescue robots are poised to go from lab to quake scene

[From The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Wired Campus blog]

In Japan, Rescue Robots Are Poised to Go From Lab to Quake Scene

March 15, 2011
By Ben Wieder

Last Thursday night, Robin R. Murphy, director of the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue at Texas A&M University, held a goodbye party in College Station for Japanese robotics researchers who had come to the center for workshops on using their creations in an emergency.

The next day, the workshops became reality. The massive earthquake and tsunami that ravaged Japan that Friday meant the scientists, already booked on a plane, were rushing home to help.

Satoshi Tadokoro of Tohoku University, based in Sendai, one of the cities hardest hit by the disaster, raced back with his team to offer the use of a robot developed at Tohoku. The snakelike robot can enter tight spaces and use a camera to survey them, something particularly helpful in collapsed buildings, says Ms.… read more. “In Japan, rescue robots are poised to go from lab to quake scene”

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Call: “I Know Where I’m Going” – Remote Access to World Heritage Sites from St Kilda to Uluru

“I Know Where I’m Going”

Remote Access to World Heritage Sites from St Kilda to Uluru

23-24 November 2011- Edinburgh (UK)

CALL FOR PAPERS

At a time of economic crisis and environmental threat, countries everywhere are addressing the dual challenge of protecting and preserving their natural and cultural heritage while maximizing its economic value. This two-day international conference will focus on the potential of new technologies to create high-quality, remote-access, visitor experiences for World Heritage Sites and other sites of cultural, historical and natural significance where remote access is desirable or necessary.

The conference has three main aims:

  1. To showcase the new technologies available: including the 3D laser scanning of St Kilda WHS as part of the Scottish Ten project to create exceptionally accurate digital models of Scotland’s five UNESCO World Heritage Sites and others worldwide, in order to better conserve and manage them (http://www.scottishten.org/).
read more. “Call: “I Know Where I’m Going” – Remote Access to World Heritage Sites from St Kilda to Uluru”
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Viewing 3D movies on small screens could lead to radically different depth perceptions

[From MIT’s Technology Review blog Mims’ Bits]

Don’t Expect Mobile 3D Movies to Look the Same

Film buffs and video game junkies could be surprised by how media look on the Nintentdo 3DS and 3D-equipped mobile phones.

Christopher Mims 03/04/2011

Viewing 3D movies on small screens could lead to radically different perceptions of relative depth when compared to seeing them in the theater or on a television, conclude Nokia engineers.

In a paper published in the Proceedings of Stereoscopic Displays and Applications, Jukka Hakkinen and colleagues tested three short animations on viewers. What they discovered is a direct consequence of how we perceive depth and how it is recorded via dual cameras when creating 3D films: the closer you are to a display and the smaller it is, the greater the perceived difference of depth of features in a scene.… read more. “Viewing 3D movies on small screens could lead to radically different depth perceptions”

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Call: Symposium and book: “Transforming University Teaching into Learning via Simulations and Games”

This is a general message that the Learning in Higher Education (LIHE) site is open for submission of abstracts for the book tentatively titled – TRANSFORMING UNIVERSITY TEACHING INTO LEARNING VIA SIMULATIONS AND GAMES – to be published in conjunction with the International Academic Association for the Enhancement of Learning in Higher Education (LIHE)

The call for contributions is at
http://lihe.wordpress.com/future-events/lihe11-australia/symposium-call/

You are invited to submit your abstracts for the conference process and publication. The schedule leading to the publication date is set out below and details on what to include in your proposal are on the web site. The publishers are keen to make this a strong volume in the LIHE series and your contribution will be valued.

Please email me with any questions. As the book will be published almost immediately after the conference acceptance will lead to publication as a book chapter – since the submission process works to support and develop the authors to ensure the book is the best possible of its kind.… read more. “Call: Symposium and book: “Transforming University Teaching into Learning via Simulations and Games””

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TV’s green screen revolution creates convincing illusions

[From TV Squad; more videos and information are here]

TV’s Green Screen Revolution Is Here

by Ryan McKee, posted Feb 19th 2011

As savvy television fans already know, many shows do not shoot on location. Seeing TV characters walk down Broadway in New York does not mean they were actually there. In fact, chances are they weren’t even in the Big Apple, or even within thousands of feet of it.

It’s getting even easier for television studios to create locations or backdrops thanks to green screen technology, and TV is taking as much (if not more) advantage of green screen as movies. And we’re not just talking about the science fiction shows. Some series that [are] set in the real world are actually shooting in some warehouse or vacant lot.

You’d think avid TV watchers could pick out the fake backdrops.… read more. “TV’s green screen revolution creates convincing illusions”

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Call: International Association for Computing and Philosophy conference (IACAP 2011)

IACAP 2011

International Association for Computing and Philosophy (IACAP)
First International Conference of IACAP:

Celebrating 25 years of Computing and Philosophy (CAP) conferences
Aarhus University (Denmark) – July 4-6, 2011

Conference Theme, “The Computational Turn: Past, Presents, Futures?”

In the West, philosophical attention to computation and computational devices is at least as old as Leibniz. But since the early 1940s, electronic computers have evolved from a few machines filling several rooms to widely diffused – indeed, ubiquitous – devices, ranging from networked desktops, laptops, smartphones and “the internet of things.” Along the way, initial philosophical attention – in particular, to the ethical and social implications of these devices (so Norbert Wiener, 1950) – became sufficiently broad and influential as to justify the phrase “the computational turn” by the 1980s. In part, the computational turn referred to the multiple ways in which the increasing availability and usability of computers allowed philosophers to explore a range of traditional philosophical interests – e.g., in logic, artificial intelligence, philosophical mathematics, ethics, political philosophy, epistemology, ontology, to name a few – in new ways, often shedding significant new light on traditional issues and arguments.… read more. “Call: International Association for Computing and Philosophy conference (IACAP 2011)”

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Geminoid DK, realistic replica of human professor Henrik Scharfe

[From Fast Company, where the story includes a video and additional images]

Will the Human, Non-Geminoid Henrik Scharfe Please Stand Up?

By Kit Eaton
Mar 7, 2011

How would you feel if you met Danish Professor Henrik Scharfe and then moments later were introduced to another Henrik Scharfe, this time an almost identical android? You can now actually do this, courtesy of a new Geminoid bot that points the way to our robotic future.

A product of Japanese scientist Hiroshi Ishiguro, the Geminoid series robots have always been a weird headline-grabbing affairs due to their incredibly convincing human “skins,” but the latest version–Geminoid DK–may have advanced the technology the furthest it’s ever been. When you see the bot in action, and glance at its prototype, the real Professor Scharfe, you’ll be hard pressed to not drop your jaw.… read more. “Geminoid DK, realistic replica of human professor Henrik Scharfe”

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Call: A Sonic Geography: Rethinking Auditory Spatial Practice (for Interference: A Journal of Audio Culture)

Call for Papers: A Sonic Geography: Rethinking Auditory Spatial Practice

Interference: A Journal Of Audio Culture
An online peer-reviewed journal in association with Gradcam and the CTVR, Trinity College Dublin
http://www.interferencejournal.com/

There now exists a significant body of work exploring the confluence of spatial and sonic practices, with recent literature acknowledging the role of sound in the ongoing production, regulation and conceptual representation of space. Aural architecture, soundscaping and sonic sculpture abound, as do accounts of sonic strategies for the delineation of territory, the performance of identity, and the management of difference within physical, and more recently, mobile, virtual, and networked spaces.

Events in the mainstream art world that took place in 2010,  such as the inclusion of John Wynne’s untitled sound sculpture for 300 speakers, Pianola, and vacuum cleaner in the Newspeak: British Art Now exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery, and Susan Philipsz’ reception of the Turner prize for her public sonic intervention ‘Lowlands’, demonstrate that this field of sound-based, spatially distributed practice has reached a level of maturity that resonates with a larger public, and is embraced on an institutional level that facilitates future production.  … read more. “Call: A Sonic Geography: Rethinking Auditory Spatial Practice (for Interference: A Journal of Audio Culture)”

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Truly involving theatre

[From Whatsonstage.com; more information about the reviewed work is available here and here]

Jo Caird Blog: Truly Involving Theatre

8 March 2011

In the past couple of years I’ve spent far too much time on Twitter, so I’ve been aware of some of the interesting theatre-related events that have taken place there, such as the RSC’s Such Tweet Sorrow, which saw an online cast improvise a story based on Romeo and Juliet over the course of five weeks, and American playwright Jeremy Gable’s The 15th Line, a four-hander which took place entirely on Twitter (you can read its script here).

This Sunday though, was the first time I’ve actually engaged with and physically taken part in such an event. It’s not often that I look back on a series of tweets to jog my memory about a piece of theatre, but that’s exactly what I’ve had to do in preparation for writing this blog post.… read more. “Truly involving theatre”

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