ISPR Presence News

Monthly Archives: March 2011

Call: Cognitive Science & the Moving Image seminar

Cognitive Science & the Moving Image

Wednesday 30th March 2011
 2:00 – 4:30 pm followed by a wine reception

Red Room, Chelsea College of Art & Design, 16 John Islip Street, London SW1P 4JU

Professor Murray Smith, The University of Kent
Professor Ian Christie, Birkbeck, University of London
Dr. Tim Smith, Birkbeck, University of London

CCW Graduate School is delighted to present three leading scholars, representing different perspectives and disciplines, who are now turning to science to expand the territory of film history and theory. They have been working with cognitive scientists, some using the latest brain imaging techniques, in order to better understand how people watch and comprehend film. The seminar will include practical demonstrations as well as discussions of the theoretical, cultural and scientific background to their research.… read more. “Call: Cognitive Science & the Moving Image seminar”

Posted in Calls | Comments closed

Eye-tracking cameras offer a new way to control your computer

[From MIT’s Technology Review]

A Laptop that Knows Where You’re Looking

Eye-tracking cameras offer a new way to control your computer.

Friday, March 4, 2011
By Tom Simonite

A camera over the screen is a standard feature for laptops. But only Lenovo’s new model has a pair of cameras below its display to track the movements of a user’s eyes.

The prototype laptop can be controlled with eye motions, reducing the need to use the mouse and making it faster to navigate through information such as maps or menus.

The laptop can notice when its user has read to near the bottom of a page and can automatically scroll down to reveal more text. The same trick also makes it possible to browse through an e-mail in-box without using the mouse at all. When using a map application, the user can zoom in on an area by looking at it and scrolling the mouse wheel.… read more. “Eye-tracking cameras offer a new way to control your computer”

Posted in Presence in the News | Comments closed

Call: Scientific Theatre (SciT’11) – Multidisciplinary Approach to Designing Intelligent Environments

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

International Workshop
Scientific Theatre (SciT’11)
Multidisciplinary Approach to Designing Intelligent Environments

In conjunction with the 7th International Conference on Intelligent Environments (IE’11)
Nottingham – UK. 25th-26th of July 2011

http://scientific-theatre.com

Background:

Technology is becoming increasingly people centric. Intelligent environments, pervasive and ubiquitous computing, sensing and mobile technology etc are all about people (of various backgrounds) interacting with technology. This workshop is an attempt to encourage multidisciplinary approach to designing Intelligent Environments and open up (often sophisticated) research advances in IT to as wide an audience as is possible. To achieve this, the most ancient form of communication, namely creative art (along with the more conventional methods, such as academic writing), will be used as means to convey the latest scientific achievements related to the topic of Intelligent Environments.

Goals:

  • To explore what various disciplines have to say about, and can contribute, to the future development of Intelligent Environments.
read more. “Call: Scientific Theatre (SciT’11) – Multidisciplinary Approach to Designing Intelligent Environments”
Posted in Calls | Comments closed

Harrisburg University’s Virtusphere has potential for experimentation, education and revenue

[From PennLive, where the story also features a 1:14 minute video]

[Image: Harrisburg University senior Todd Baker prepares to try the Virtusphere, a virtual reality device, for the first time. Students are working with companies to create virtual worlds for real life training. Credit: Christine Baker, The Patriot-News]

Harrisburg University’s Virtusphere has potential for experimentation, education and revenue

March 08, 2011
By Kourtney Geers, The Patriot-News

Crawl inside this 10-foot human hamster ball and you’ll be able to go just about anywhere.

The ball, called a Virtusphere, allows the person inside to wander around unhindered, exploring virtual environments seen through a wireless headset. It’s the latest technological investment made by Harrisburg University.

The sphere made its first appearance at the science and technology school in downtown Harrisburg in June at the Learning and Entertainment Evolution Forum, where leaders in the industry of cutting-edge technology met to show off their latest developments.… read more. “Harrisburg University’s Virtusphere has potential for experimentation, education and revenue”

Posted in Presence in the News | Comments closed

Call: A Symposium on Game-Based Learning (GBL)

A Symposium on Game-Based Learning (GBL) will be organised at Waterford Institute of Technology on 19th – 20th May 2011.

The purpose of this symposium is to:

  • Report on the use of GBL in Irish primary, secondary and third-level education
  • Define the roadmap for GBL in Ireland
  • Provide evidence of the effectiveness of GBL to both motivate and learn
  • Identify how GBL can be included and facilitated in Irish instructional settings.

Target Audience

This symposium will bring together teachers, lecturers, students and researchers, and provide insights from different perspectives such as educational psychology, sociology, Human Computer Interaction (HCI), Artificial Intelligence, Game Design, or Instructional Design. It will also be a great opportunity to network and share ideas with other researchers and practitioners.… read more. “Call: A Symposium on Game-Based Learning (GBL)”

Posted in Calls | Comments closed

Online, people learn best from virtual ‘helpers’ that resemble them

[From The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Wired Campus blog]

[Image Courtesy of Lori Foster Thompson]

Online, People Learn Best from Virtual ‘Helpers’ That Resemble Them

March 3, 2011
By Ben Wieder

Turns out looks and personality still count in online learning.

That’s the finding of a study on how people’s perception and performance in online training is affected by the appearance and communication style of online learning “helpers,” or virtual agents that pop up on a screen and guide people through a program.

Some of the earliest uses of such programs have been with younger students. One program used an online helper named Herman to help students identify different types of plants, says the study’s lead author, Tara Behrend, an assistant professor of organizational sciences at George Washington University. She says online helpers typically serve as coaches or mentors, urging a participant through a program, rather than as an instructor.… read more. “Online, people learn best from virtual ‘helpers’ that resemble them”

Posted in Presence in the News | Comments closed

Job: PhD Studentship – Remote clinical consultations using Superfast Broadband connectivity

EPSRC – DTA PhD Studentship available on
Serious Games for Medical Education
at Sheffield University, Computer Science UK

Title: Remote clinical consultations using Superfast Broadband connectivity

Supervisors:
Daniela Romano and Nicolas Martin
http://staffwww.dcs.shef.ac.uk/people/D.Romano/
http://www.shef.ac.uk/dentalschool/staff/profiles/martin.html

Deadline for application 31st March 2011

The award covers UK fees and a stipend at the standard UK research rate of £13,590.

Eligibility

Applicants should have, or expect to achieve, a minimum of an upper-second-class Honours degree (2.1 or above) or a Master’s degree in Computer Science with a specialization in any of the followings: 3D Graphics, data processing and transmission, data security and interested in Serious Games and Medical Education.

Summary

A fully funded 3 year EPSRC-DTA PhD studentship is available in the field of Serious Games for Medical Education.  This studentship offers a valuable opportunity to work within a multidisciplinary team of scientists, clinicians and educators in the department of Computer Science, School of Clinical Dentistry and with the industrial partner Digital Region South Yorkshire (http://www.digitalregion.co.uk/) providing a dedicated connectivity network.… read more. “Job: PhD Studentship – Remote clinical consultations using Superfast Broadband connectivity”

Posted in Jobs | Comments closed

Are physical interfaces superior to virtual ones?

[From the MIT Technology Review blog Mims’ Bits]

Are Physical Interfaces Superior to Virtual Ones?

Humans have enormous capacity for spatial memory. Why don’t our user interfaces take advantage of that?

Christopher Mims 03/02/2011

Something’s been bothering me ever since I started reading books, especially non-fiction, on my Kindle:

I can’t remember where anything is. Physical books are full of spatial reference points; an especially beloved book is a physical topography in which we develop a vague sense of which chapters contain relevant information; even where, on a page, a particularly striking sentence or diagram lies.

Ebooks have none of these referents. They’re searchable (or at least, some are) which mitigates this issue somewhat. But I’m unlikely to remember that a fact was at “41% through a book” for one simple reason: my hands never got a chance to find out what 41% through a particular ebook feels like.… read more. “Are physical interfaces superior to virtual ones?”

Posted in Presence in the News | Comments closed

Call: Performative interfaces: Do machines dream of electric sheep?

TaPRA Conference 2011
University of Kingston, UK
7th- 9th September 2011

Theatre & Performance Research Association
Performance and New Technologies Working Group
Performative interfaces: do machines dream of electric sheep?

As a working group interested in the performative interfaces between humans and technologies, we feel that questions about how we interact with machines; the intimacy of that interaction and the immersive nature of these performances have been lost in a maze of theoretical dependency. Rather than looking at the humanity of the interaction, we tend to justify these interfaces through cerebral analyses based on various theories from Deeluze/Guattari’s rhizome to posthumanism. With this call for papers we would like to move away from this typology and invite performances and provocations, that address the multisensory exploration of the interaction between humans and machines. We would like the speakers and performers to explore topics of intimate human communication through the senses, touch, smell, sound, and tasting in innovative ways that talk about the people we are, and the machines we use.… read more. “Call: Performative interfaces: Do machines dream of electric sheep?”

Posted in Calls | Comments closed

Fly by thinking it: Emotiv EEG headset hacked into VR trapeze act

[From Engadget, where a 7:34 minute video and two other videos are available]

Emotiv EEG headset hacked into VR trapeze act, lets you fly like Superman (video)

By Sean Hollister posted Mar 1st 2011

Last year, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute students built a virtual reality contraption that let them soar through the sky, held aloft by a trapeze harness and seeing through HMD-covered eyes. This year, they’re controlling it with the power of their minds. For his master’s thesis, project leader Yehuda Duenyas added an Emotiv headset — the same one controlling cars and the occasional game — to make the wearer seemingly able to levitate themselves into the air by carefully concentrating. Sure, by comparison it’s a fairly simple trick, but the effect is nothing short of movie magic.… read more. “Fly by thinking it: Emotiv EEG headset hacked into VR trapeze act”

Posted in Presence in the News | Comments closed
  • Find Researchers

    Use the links below to find researchers listed alphabetically by the first letter of their last name.

    A | B | C | D | E | F| G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

css.php