ISPR Presence News

Monthly Archives: May 2021

Call: Workshop on the Embodiment of Things (EoT 2021) at British HCI Conference

Call for Papers

The Workshop on the Embodiment of Things (EoT 2021)
Co-located with the 33rd British Human Computer Interaction Conference
19th July, 2021
Online
https://hci2021.bcs.org/workshop-1/

Submission deadline: 15th June, 2021

The Workshop on the Embodiment of Things (EoT 2021) will be held online on the 19th July and is co-located with the 33rd British Human Computer Interaction Conference (https://hci2021.bcs.org)

INTRODUCTION

The goal of this workshop is to bring researchers and practitioners from national and international cultural heritage (CH) organisations together with those from across HCI and related fields. We aim to establish how an alertness to tertiary embodiment (mind-body-artefact) can provide the ground for bringing artefacts to life, catalyse collective knowledge production, enable collaboration, and encourage the creative integration of computational and archival thinking. For example, in building on AI methods to create a visual search platform, the Deep Discoveries collaborative project at The National Archives fosters embodied interaction with national collections.… read more. “Call: Workshop on the Embodiment of Things (EoT 2021) at British HCI Conference”

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Experimental 3D hyper-telepresence: Google’s Project Starline

[I’m sure many of us would like to try out Google’s new prototype system for social presence called Project Starline, described in this first-person report from Wired. See the original story for two looping mini-videos and see Google’s 1:50 minute video on YouTube. –Matthew]

Google’s Project Starline Videoconference Tech Wants to Turn You Into a Hologram

Our reporter tests out a “video booth” to glimpse the future of telepresence.

By Lauren Goode
May 18, 2021

Over the past several years, Google has been working hard to craft software experiences that make you feel like you’re present with another human being, even if they’re several time zones away. On one end of the spectrum is boring Google Meet, the company’s Zoom competitor. On the other, more daring end is the now discontinued virtual-reality platform Daydream, complete with goggles and hand controllers.… read more. “Experimental 3D hyper-telepresence: Google’s Project Starline”

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Call: “Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Human-Computer Interaction” issue of Big Data and Cognitive Computing

[Important note: I have avoided posting Calls for Papers that involve the requirement that authors pay a fee for submission and/or publication but will now do so when the topic is particularly relevant to the presence community. In these cases, as with the Call below, I will add an explicit note near the top of the post specifying the fee. For more information about these fees, see AJE Scholar’s “Understanding Submission and Publication Fees” and Wikipedia’s entry on Article Processing Charges. –Matthew]

Call for Papers

“Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Human-Computer Interaction”
A special issue of Big Data and Cognitive Computing
(ISSN 2504-2289)
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/BDCC/special_issues/Virt_Reality

Deadline for abstract submissions: 31 July 2021
Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

NOTE: The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs), which at this writing is 1,553 USD.… read more. “Call: “Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Human-Computer Interaction” issue of Big Data and Cognitive Computing”

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Meet virtual reality, your new physical therapist

[Although there’s much more research to do, particularly on the specific role of presence, this New York Times story suggests another positive application of presence-evoking technology. See the original story for a second image and a 2:52 minute video (also available via YouTube). –Matthew]

[Image: Michael Heinrich, who lost the use of the lower half of his body after an accident, undergoes virtual reality therapy. “From an emotional standpoint, coming off an injury where I lost the majority of the use of my body, V.R. pushed the boundaries of what I thought was possible,” he said. Credit: Michigan Medicine]

Meet Virtual Reality, Your New Physical Therapist

While use of the gaming technology for improving physical ailments is still in the early stages, it shows promise — and it’s fun.

By Alina Tugend
Published April 21, 2021; updated May 5, 2021

[This article is part of our new series on the Future of Health Care, which examines changes in the medical field.]

Four years ago, Michael Heinrich was riding his motorcycle on the University of Michigan campus when a rotted tree fell on him and snapped his neck, causing him to permanently lose use of the lower half of his body.… read more. “Meet virtual reality, your new physical therapist”

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Call: Amazing Folks in Tech: VR in the Medical Field – Free online LA SIGGRAPH event

Call for Participation

Amazing Folks in Tech: VR in the Medical Field
A free online event from LA ACM SIGGRAPH
June 8, 2021
https://lasiggraph.org/event/amazing-folks-tech

REGISTER FOR FREE WITH ZOOM until May 26, 2021

PRESENTERS:
Andrew Melchior, Founder, 3rd Space Agency
JohnLeah, Founder, 3rd Space Agency
Greg Ruthenbeck, Director, Exagen Oy
Daish Malani, Founder, Technical Director, Add Life Technologies
Kyle Carlin, Moderator

DESCRIPTION:
As medical professionals strive to use VR with accuracy: learn from three medical professionals using VR. VR in the Medical Field will be LA ACM SIGGRAPH’s June 8th event. Join us here at LA SIGGRAPH for a magical night where we show the bridge between medicine and technology. Featuring speakers:

John Leah and Andrew Melchoir are the Team from 3rd Space Agency. Their presentation covers work in virtual medical rooms and how that shapes how we communicate.

Daish Malani is the founder of Add Life Technologies.… read more. “Call: Amazing Folks in Tech: VR in the Medical Field – Free online LA SIGGRAPH event”

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“Artificially intimate” technologies are changing the way we interact

[This link-filled story from The Conversation summarizes some of the presence-related themes of the author’s new book Artificial Intimacy: Virtual friends, Digital Lovers and Algorithmic Matchmakers. See the original story for two more images. –Matthew]

Sex bots, virtual friends, VR lovers: Tech is changing the way we interact, and not always for the better

By Rob Brooks, Scientia Professor of Evolutionary Ecology; Academic Lead of the University of New South Wales Grand Challenges Program, UNSW
May 2, 2021

Twenty-first century technologies such as robots, virtual reality (VR) and artificial intelligence (AI) are creeping into every corner of our social and emotional lives — hacking how we form friendships, build intimacy, fall in love and get off.

In my recently-published book, I consider the possibilities, both terrifying and inspiring, offered by these “artificially intimate” technologies.

On one hand, these tools can help deliver much-needed support.… read more. ““Artificially intimate” technologies are changing the way we interact”

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Call: “Dis/abling Spaces and Cultures in Times of Crisis” issue of Space and Culture

Call for Papers

Dis/abling Spaces and Cultures in Times of Crisis
Special issue of Space and Culture journal, forthcoming online in 2022
Michael Schillmeier, Editor
https://www.spaceandculture.com/2021/04/05/call-for-papers-dis-abling-spaces-and-cultures-in-times-of-crisis/

Deadline for abstracts: May 31, 2021

With the COVID 19 pandemic we experience the adverse effects, ambiguities, uncertainties, insecurities of a global crisis that links and separates embodied, personal, social and cultural lives. Although the crisis may affect everyone, it is obvious that people who are disabled, marginalized, discriminated, vulnerable, ill, and/or live through precarious situations are at high risk to be become more disabled, more discriminated, more vulnerable or ill, and precarity deepens and spreads. Physical distancing, quarantining, self-isolation, wearing masks and other hygiene practices of protection have impactful and highly diverse and disputed effects on dis/abling spaces and cultures and how they are lived, felt and experienced.

It is the very experience of the ongoing global crisis that draw attention on the situated relations of dis/embodied, spatial and cultural practices that constitute dis/abling experiences that this Special Issue wishes to address and critically engage with.… read more. “Call: “Dis/abling Spaces and Cultures in Times of Crisis” issue of Space and Culture”

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Virtual reality warps your sense of time

[We seem to lose track of time when we’re using virtual reality (and other presence-evoking media technologies?), as demonstrated in the new study reported in this story from UC Santa Cruz. Follow the link in the story to read the new article in the journal Timing & Time Perception. –Matthew]

Virtual reality warps your sense of time

Psychology research demonstrates unique ‘time compression’ effect of virtual reality

By Allison Arteaga Soergel
May 12, 2021

Grayson Mullen was playing a virtual reality game at a friend’s house when, suddenly, he noticed that something very strange was happening.

“I stopped playing the game, and I realized that I had no idea how much time had passed,” he recalled. “I was supposed to be taking turns with other people, and I was worried that I had played for too long because I couldn’t even guess if it had been 10 minutes or 40 minutes.”

At the time, Mullen was a cognitive science undergraduate at UC Santa Cruz, so naturally, this experience piqued his interest.… read more. “Virtual reality warps your sense of time”

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Call: Trust, Acceptance and Social Cues in Robot Interaction (SCRITA) workshop at IEEE RO-MAN 2021

Call for Papers

Trust, Acceptance and Social Cues in Human-Robot Interaction (SCRITA) Workshop
In conjunction with the IEEE RO-MAN 2021 conference
12 August, 2021
https://scrita.herts.ac.uk

Deadline for submissions: June 13th, 2021

This workshop will be a full day event on 12 August, 2021 in conjunction with the IEEE RO-MAN 2021 conference, which is organised by the University of British Columbia and University of Waterloo, Canada.

STATEMENT OF OBJECTIVES

Trust is a fundamental aspect that helps to foster effective collaboration between people and robots. It is imperative that people trust robots to not create a hazardous situation, such as starting a fire when trying to make a cup of tea or giving the wrong medicine to a vulnerable person. Likewise, people should be able to trust robots not to create an unsafe situation, such as leaving the door open unattended or providing personal information to strangers – and potentially to thieves.… read more. “Call: Trust, Acceptance and Social Cues in Robot Interaction (SCRITA) workshop at IEEE RO-MAN 2021”

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The evolution of “Imitative technology” and its post-COVID impact on work

[A new long story in City Journal magazine presents a useful, link-filled history of what the author calls imitative technologies and then turns to the long-term impact of the pandemic on our use of telepresence and telecommuting; an extended excerpt is below. –Matthew]

[Image: With virtual reality and augmented reality, the line between the real world and the world of representation has gotten even blurrier. Credit: Mark Rightmire/Medianews Group/Orange County Register/Getty Images]

The Great Fake

Digital advances have taken imitative technology on a miraculous trajectory—bringing new challenges but also new possibilities.

By Joel Mokyr, a professor of economics and history at Northwestern University and the author of A Culture of Growth: The Origins of the Modern Economy
Spring 2021

[snip]

One technology that has dramatically advanced in the past century could be called “imitating life”—creating images and sounds that reproduce aspects of reality, making the observer “experience” something that he or she is not actually physically living through.… read more. “The evolution of “Imitative technology” and its post-COVID impact on work”

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