Call: AI and Moral Responsibility online workshop

Call for Participation

AI & Moral Responsibility
Responsibility Matters Workshop Series (RMWS)
October 21, 16.00-20.00hrs EET (Bucharest time)
Online via Zoom
http://comore.ccea.ro/responsibility-matters-workshop-series-ai-moral-responsibility/

We cordially invite you to the first edition of the Responsibility Matters Workshop Series (RMWS): AI & Moral Responsibility.

We are technically on the verge of deploying self-driving cars, autonomous weapon systems, robotic caregivers or artificial companions. But the perspective of scaling up such AI systems raises several ethical concerns. Who is morally responsible for the decisions taken by highly autonomous AI systems in these various domains? Whom do we blame for the effects generated by these artificial entities on the roads, in military conflicts, medical settings or even in our homes? How can our current ethical frameworks make sense of AI moral responsibility? These are the main questions that drive researchers into open debate on a timely and pressing topic of the decade: AI & moral responsibility.

When: October 21, 16.00-20.00hrs EET (Bucharest time)

Where: online, via Zoom platform

Who: Keynote speakers: prof. Roger Crisp (St. Anne’s College, Oxford); prof. Julian Savulescu (Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics)

Guest speakers: Andreas Theodorou (Umeå University), Emilian Mihailov (ENHATEC project, University of Bucharest)

CoMoRe team: Cristina Voinea, Radu Uszkai, Constantin Vică, Mihaela Constantinescu

How: detailed workshop schedule and other useful information is available on our website: http://comore.ccea.ro/responsibility-matters-workshop-series-ai-moral-responsibility/

The event is organized by members of the Research Center in Applied Ethics (University of Bucharest), within the CoMoRe project (http://comore.ccea.ro/comore-project/). The aim of our two-year research project is that of exploring under what conditions could (robotic) AI systems be morally praise- or blame- worthy for their actions and whether the Aristotelian virtue ethics framework is adequate to address moral responsibility issues related to AI deployment.

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