ISPR Presence News

Monthly Archives: April 2014

Dying woman goes outside for last time via Oculus Rift

[From The Rift Arcade, where the story includes a 12:54 minute video –  the last segment, beginning at 9:50, is particularly worth watching]

Grandma in OculusRift Streetview

How the Oculus Rift helped Roberta Firstenberg battle cancer

17 Apr, 2014 Tom Rudderham

“I can’t believe it. I mean, you hear about things that like that, and you think you’re all prepared for it, and it’s like dropping into a mirage… into a new life… it’s beautiful… it’s awe-inspiring.”

–Roberta Firstenberg

By the end of 2013, Roberta Firstenberg was losing her battle with cancer. After several months of radiation therapy and chemotherapy, she was told that the treatments were no longer effective. It was around this time that her granddaughter, Priscilla Firstenberg – a 2D and 3D video game artist – moved in to help take care of her. Pri would come home after work each night and sit with her grandma. The two would talk long into the evening until Roberta fell asleep. It was during this time that Pri decided to record her grandma’s most cherished memories and stories. One night, Roberta revealed an usual dream she’d had, where a future, time travelling version of Pri and her sister came to visit. They promised to take Roberta back into the future and cure her cancer, using a time travelling chair that would also enable her to explore and see the world once again. Roberta remarked how she missed the outside world, in particular how she could no longer step into her own yard. Her favourite pastime was caring for the garden.

“I had a hard time sleeping that night,” Pri told me, “that was one of the hard hitting conversations we’ve had where I truly felt helpless.” The next day, she found herself debating the next generation of consoles with her co-workers. Pri argued in favour of the Oculus Rift, which was bringing something new to the table, while her co-workers championed the merits of the Xbox One and Playstation 4. “As I brought up more points about the Rift, it suddenly clicked – there might as well have been a literal light bulb above my head – traveling, going outside, just sitting in a chair, etc. That night I went out on a limb and emailed the support center for the Oculus Rift.” Read more on Dying woman goes outside for last time via Oculus Rift…

Posted in Presence in the News | Leave a comment

Call: OzCHI 2014 – Designing Futures: The Future of Design

OzCHI 2014 Designing Futures: the Future of Design

2-5 December 2014 Sydney, Australia

OZCHI is the annual conference for the Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group (CHISIG) of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia, a non-profit event. It is Australia’s leading forum for work in all areas of Human-Computer Interaction. OZCHI attracts an international community of practitioners, researchers, academics and students from a wide range of disciplines including user experience designers, information architects, software engineers, human factors experts, information systems analysts, social scientists or managers. We look forward to your involvement at this year’s OZCHI conference.

This year’s theme is about how we can shape the future of human-centred technology design in a fast changing technology landscape. We invite contributions on all topics related to Human-Computer Interaction, Interaction Design and the design of interactive technologies, including practical, technical, empirical and theoretical aspects. We particularly welcome contributions from those design approaches that deal with emergent technologies in an ever diversifying environment of use.

INITIAL SUBMISSIONS
7 July 2014: Long Papers/Industry Case Studies (Note – one week extension!)
21 July 2014: Workshop proposals
1 September 2014 Short Papers/Demos/Doc consortium

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE
22 August 2014: Long Papers/Industry Case Studies
22 August 2014: Workshops
3 October 2014: Short Papers/Demos/Doc consortium

CONFERENCE TOPICS

In keeping with the theme “Design Futures: the Future of Design”, topics of interest include, but are not limited to: Read more on Call: OzCHI 2014 – Designing Futures: The Future of Design…

Posted in Calls | Leave a comment

Explore the bridge of ‘Star Trek: Voyager’ through Oculus Rift

[From The Verge, where the story includes a 3:18 minute video; for a related story, see  “Oculus Rift Now Lets You Ride the ‘Back to the Future’ Hoverboard” at Mashable]

Voyager bridge in Oculus Rift

Explore the bridge of ‘Star Trek: Voyager’ through Oculus Rift

By Jacob Kastrenakes on April 21, 2014

The Oculus Rift has been used to transport people everywhere from Jerry Seinfeld’s fictional apartment to another human’s body, and over the weekend, one developer began taking gamers someplace even a bit further from reality: to the bridge of Star Trek: Voyager‘s famous ship. The new virtual reality demo lets you walk around a fairly accurate recreation of the Voyager’s bridge and even allows you to stare out into space as you whiz past distant stars. You’ll be exploring the ship alone, however — unfortunately, no familiar crew members will be around for you to bump into, though you may just hear their voices off-screen. Read more on Explore the bridge of ‘Star Trek: Voyager’ through Oculus Rift…

Posted in Presence in the News | Leave a comment

Call: Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts International Conference – DRHA 2014

Call for Papers

Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts International Conference – DRHA 2014

EXTENDED Deadline Proposals (300 word abstract): Monday, 28th April 2014

The University of Greenwich and the Department of Creative Professions and Digital Arts, will host the DRHA2014 [Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts] International conference for the first time in its history, from 31st August 2014 -3rd September 2014.

Theme: Communication Futures: Connecting interdisciplinary design practices in arts/culture, academia and the creative industries

Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts [DRHA] is an annual conference whose goal is to bring together the creators, users, distributors, and custodians of digital research and resources in the arts, design and humanities to explore the capture, archiving and communication of complex and creative research processes. DRHA provides an intellectual and physical space for cross-disciplinary discussion and the generation of new ideas, resulting in many new networks and productive research relationships.

Human beings, as users, have always been obsessed with finding new ways of communicating through various techniques and technologies.

The rapid technological changes that have occurred during the last two decades have allowed us – the users – to communicate through various social media platforms, providing us with more easily, faster and more frequently ways of communicating. However there are always concerns about other impacts those technologies might have on the communication processes.

The aim of the conference is to facilitate conversations on Design and collaborations between

  • Digital Arts and Humanities
  • Creative Industries
  • Digital Libraries and Archives

For the first time the DRHA conference would like to support and bring together the Academic environment with that of the Creative industries under a conference that will affect the current interdisciplinary creative practices. Read more on Call: Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts International Conference – DRHA 2014…

Posted in Calls | Leave a comment

Honda’s ASIMO robot is evolving

[From Wired, where the story includes more images and a video]

ASIMO robot using sign language

[Image: Honda’s newest version of its advanced humanoid robot, ASIMO, signs with its hands during a demonstration for media outlets at the Westin Grand Central Hotel in Manhattan. Andrew White/WIRED]

Watch the Astounding Dexterity of Honda’s Dancing Humanoid Robot

By Tim Moynihan  04.19.14

Even in today’s rapidly evolving world of technology, there are few things that make your jaw drop when you see them in real life. Honda’s ASIMO is one of those things.

When you witness this bipedal humanoid robot hopping in a circle on one foot, taking a few steps back to line up a kick to a soccer ball, or transitioning smoothly from a walk to a slow jog, you have to remind yourself that you’re not looking at a person in a robot suit or some sort of computer-generated special effect. This is an autonomous mechanical being, capable of walking around on two legs and making its own decisions based on input from its sensors. Its name, an acronym that stands for “Advanced Step In Innovative Mobility,” appropriately evokes Isaac Asimov. Read more on Honda’s ASIMO robot is evolving…

Posted in Presence in the News | Leave a comment

Call: The End of Place as We Know It: Shifting Perspectives on Literature and Place

[Note: The submission deadline has just passed, though it may be worth inquiring. –Matthew ]

The End of Place as We Know It:
Shifting Perspectives on Literature and Place

Keynotes: Professor Edward Casey and Professor Timothy Morton
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, September 17-19, 2014

Literatures of place have often been considered conservative and reactionary. We see this expressed in the longing for a pastoral return to a former Golden Age, in the nostalgic desire to rediscover the home of a long lost childhood, or in that of national extremism as expressed through a practice of territorial and racial purity. However, contemporary theorists have pointed out that ‘place’ is not a stable entity. Place is ‘radically indeterminate – it is intrinsically in question, is a question’ (Timothy Morton, Ecology Without Nature). Accordingly, if ‘place itself is no fixed thing’ (Edward Casey, The Fate of Place), then place has the capacity to ‘change us, not through some visceral belonging (some barely changing rootedness, as so many would have it) but through the practicing of place’ (Doreen Massey, For Space). An attachment to, and investment in, place can be gainfully employed to open up, rather than close down, questions of identity, territory, and nationality.

Yet it is not simply the theory of place that has undergone fundamental change in recent years. Our lives have been changed due to the rapid development in transportation and communication technologies, explosive growth in migrant mobility, a rise in global population, as well as the sudden shifts enacted by natural and manmade disasters. The fabric of place is changing physically as well as socially. In addition, the breakdown of barriers between the human and the inhuman, the citizen and the foreigner, the actual and the virtual, has complicated questions of belonging for individuals as for entire communities.

The conference invites paper submissions ranging from re-readings of place and texts traditionally considered to be regressive and restrictive, to discussions of contemporary writings on place. Topics might include but are not limited to: Read more on Call: The End of Place as We Know It: Shifting Perspectives on Literature and Place…

Posted in Calls | Leave a comment

Cyborg glasses save users the need to control emotions

[From BBC News, where the story includes more images and a 0:22 minute video; a longer video is available on YouTube]

Prof. Osawa wearing Cyborg glasses

Cyborg glasses save users the need to control emotions

By Leo Kelion Technology desk editor
16 April 2014

As Google continues to stoke excitement for its Glass smart-eyewear, a Japanese researcher has developed a radical alternative.

Rather than focus on what the owner sees, Prof Hirotaka Osawa’s kit shows computer-generated eye animations in place of the wearer’s real ones.

Special lenses let the user see out or take a secret nap if they prefer.

The professor said the glasses could be used to simulate emotional reactions when users are distracted or busy.

He added that the idea of creating an “emotional cyborg” was inspired by the work of an American sociologist who had coined the phrase “emotional labour” to refer to the use of facial expressions and body movements to show feelings.

This, Prof Osawa noted, could be a requirement for nurses, waitresses, teachers, therapists and others working in interaction-intensive professions. Read more on Cyborg glasses save users the need to control emotions…

Posted in Presence in the News | 1 Comment

Call: POST SCREEN: International Festival of Art, New Media and Cybercultures

Call for Submissions:
POST SCREEN: International Festival of Art, New Media and Cybercultures
November 28-29, 2014
Lisbon, Portugal

The Artistic Studies Research Center of the Faculty of Fine Arts of Lisbon University invites researchers and artists to submit, until May 31st, a proposal for a paper or artwork to the upcoming POST SCREEN: International Festival of Art, New Media and Cybercultures to be held in 28 and 29 of November 2014, in Lisbon, Portugal.

Read more on Call: POST SCREEN: International Festival of Art, New Media and Cybercultures…

Posted in Calls | Leave a comment

Snowden BEAMs into TED: How robotic telepresence disrupts borders

[From Robohub, where the story includes additional images]

Edward Snowden BEAMS into TED-TED

[Image: Chris Anderson interviews Edward Snowden, who appears at TED 2014 in Vancouver via BEAM telepresence robot from an unknown location in Russia.]

Snowden BEAMs into TED: How robotic telepresence disrupts borders

by Hallie Siegel and Andra Keay
March 19, 2014

Travel in some parts of the world, or for some people, can be dangerous, but robots may soon change that. Yesterday former-NSA-contractor-turned-whistleblower Edward Snowden “walked” onto the TED stage in Vancouver via BEAM telepresence robot, while safely stationed out of the US government’s reach in Russia. It was the first time Snowden, who was granted temporary asylum by the Russian government last August, had “set foot” in North America since he was charged with espionage and theft of government property by the US government. Said Snowden from his onstage perch: “I can see everyone! This is amazing!” How will lawmakers respond?

For disclosing thousands of classified documents that revealed details about the US National Security Agency’s global surveillance programs, and for perpetrating what has been called the most significant government leak in US history, Snowden has been called by some a whistle-blower and a patriot, by others a traitor. That he should grace the stages of a TED conference while in exile would have been no small feet a decade ago.

But this is 2014, the 30th anniversary of TED, and as was pointed out by Chris Anderson (who was interviewing Snowden for this event), a lot has changed since 1984: “Today, if you go to look at a copy of 1984 on Amazon.com,” said Snowden, “the NSA can see a record of that. The Russian Intelligence Service can see a record of that. The Chinese Service can see a record of that. The French service, the German service … They can all see it because it’s not encrypted.” I doubt very much that the Orwellian irony of this fact was lost on anyone in the audience, but what about the significance of Snowden’s appearance via telepresence?

Tellingly, Snowden told us, “If I had to describe myself I wouldn’t use words like ‘hero’ or ‘patriot’ and I wouldn’t use the word ‘traitor’. I’d say I’m an American, and I am a citizen, like everyone else.”

But in an age of telepresence, what does it mean to be a citizen? … a political refugee? … a dissident? … a fugitive? … a traitor? … or an alleged or convicted criminal? How does robotic telepresence technology disrupt our sense of location, boundary, border and space? Read more on Snowden BEAMs into TED: How robotic telepresence disrupts borders…

Posted in Presence in the News | Leave a comment

Call: The Art of Living with ICT: Exploring the Range of Options from ‘Adoption’ to ‘Rejection’

The Art of Living with ICT:
Exploring the Range of Options from “Adoption” to “Rejection”

iMinds-SMIT Lecture Series – Friday April 25th, 2014

Speakers:
Andrew Feenberg, Pieter Lemmens, Søren Riis, Ike Kamphof, Mark Coeckelbergh, Yoni Van Den Eede

http://smit.vub.ac.be/event/103/The_Art_of_Living_with_ICT

Our lives are nowadays impregnated with information and communication technologies and digital media, to the extent that it is all but impossible to distinguish between who “we” are and what those “media” are. We define ourselves, even give meaning to life, by way of technology.

This process of meaning-making can be framed as a project, a work that one must carry out on an everyday, personal-existential basis. But the process comes in different sizes and shapes. First, not all of it is done in an equally conscious way. Second, the larger frameworks – or worldviews – within which meaning is sought after, can differ: functionalist, consumerist, ethical, … Depending on where the emphasis lies, another form of “living with ICT” gets instantiated. Third, exactly the degree to which one understands oneself as either intertwined with or independent from his or her media, may influence implicit or explicit decision-making processes concerning the place and meaning of ICT in one’s life.

In this colloquium, we explore these issues, in general through the prism of philosophy of technology, and in particular by way of the guiding notion, significant in the recent history of philosophy, of “the art of living.” Read more on Call: The Art of Living with ICT: Exploring the Range of Options from ‘Adoption’ to ‘Rejection’…

Posted in Calls | Leave a comment
  • Find Researchers

    Use the links below to find researchers listed alphabetically by the first letter of their last name.

    A | B | C | D | E | F| G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

css.php