ISPR Presence News

Monthly Archives: January 2014

Call: “Immersive processes in Media Culture” – Special issue of Contracampo

Special Issue of Contracampo on “Immersive processes in Media Culture”

Over many decades of study in various fields of knowledge, ideas like “dive into an ocean”, “drifting”, “losing touch with reality”, among others, were used as metaphors for immersion in addition to a connotation nearly to the idea of absorption and attentional engagement on an activity. However, especially with the growth and access to new technologies in the construction of hybrid increasingly worlds, studies of immersion have been gaining new perspectives and different theories about the phenomenon have been revisited.

Thus, our interest with the proposal for a special issue on “Immersive processes in media culture” is to include the most recent studies on the phenomenon of immersion in various fields of knowledge production. We are interested in understanding the different approaches to immersive processes through the media and their methodological consolidations for the understanding of the phenomenon. Themes as the body of the subject in interrelation with media objects, the experience of interaction and absorption of new technologies of communication, the systems of spectatorship that promote immersion in various media, the relationship between immersion and construction of fictional worlds, the suspension of disbelief and active creation of belief, immersion as a performance in contemporary scenes, different types of immersion in various areas of knowledge, and other related subjects that include some of the phenomena interwoven in contemporary immersive processes, are of interest for this special issue.

We will be receiving contributions for this special issue until March 15th. Read more on Call: “Immersive processes in Media Culture” – Special issue of Contracampo…

Posted in Calls | Leave a comment

Virtual reality theatre puts experience of brain damage centre stage

[“In My Shoes experiments with alternative methods of communication. My aim is to put audiences as close to being in the shoes of a stranger as I can, I use virtual reality software, touch, taste, sound & smell to make it as true to life as possible.”… This is from The Guardian, where the story includes an additional picture.]

Jane Gauntlett leads someone through In My Shoes

[Image: Jane Gauntlett leads someone wearing audio-visual and more conventional props through a performance of In My Shoes in New York. Photograph: Amy Hart]

Virtual reality theatre puts experience of brain damage centre stage

Jane Gauntlett’s brain injury forced her to rethink her work, resulting in an intimate mix of storytelling and wearable tech

Fred McConnell, theguardian.com,
Wednesday 15 January 2014

In 2007, Jane Gauntlett was planning for a career in theatre when she was violently mugged and fell into a coma for three weeks. She suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI), the long term legacy of which includes epileptic seizures and short term memory and communication problems.

“When I woke from the coma I had no idea how severe the injury was. I was adamant that I was to become a freelance theatre producer,” says Gauntlett, who had completed the Royal Court Theatre’s Young Writers Programme while working previously for mental health charities. Initially, she stayed on track, gaining experience with interactive theatre makers at Battersea Arts Centre and producing shows in Edinburgh, London and Margate.

However, work was disrupted by epilepsy. Worse than the seizures themselves was the alarmed reaction of colleagues, and this was compounded by the humiliation of not being able to remember and communicate as freely as she once had during the creative process.

Life will never be the same

The first step toward accepting her life post-injury was to volunteer as a mentor for young people with similar issues. She worked to facilitate understanding between those she mentored and those who could in no way relate to the daily experience of TBI, which can be frustrating and scary. Those whose injuries leave no physical trace face the biggest challenge, since their problems are so easy for others to overlook. Gauntlett says the young people had to accept that life would never be the same because “communication with families, friends and strangers was often tough.”

It was this imperative for empathy between those with and without brain injuries that gave Gauntlett her route back into theatre. But to achieve her goal, she had to look beyond the spacial and relational conventions of performance. The result was a piece called In My Shoes which lacks anything one might recognise as actors or an audience and is also non-site specific. In fact, the immersive and single-user experience relies mostly on technology. Read more on Virtual reality theatre puts experience of brain damage centre stage…

Posted in Presence in the News | Leave a comment

Job: Postdoc in user interfaces at Aalto University, Finland

POSTDOC POSITION IN USER INTERFACES AT AALTO UNIVERSITY, FINLAND

The Department of Communications and Networking (Comnet) at the Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering is seeking to hire outstanding individuals for postdoctoral positions.

One of the positions will be on the topic of *user interfaces* and placed in a group established by Antti Oulasvirta. The new group will focus on computational approaches to user interface design and includes research on modeling, computational methods, and interactive tools. For topics and examples of previous research in this group, please see http://www.mpi-inf.mpg.de/~oantti/. Read more on Job: Postdoc in user interfaces at Aalto University, Finland…

Posted in Jobs | Leave a comment

Inition co-founder Millns: ‘Cyborg scenario’ will see computers in the brain replace wearable tech

[From Dezeen, where the post includes additional images and a related video]

Neil Harbisson

[Image: Neil Harbisson is the first officially recognized human cyborg, but digitally enhanced human brains may become the norm in the future. Photograph by Dan Wilton.]

“Cyborg scenario” will see computers in the brain replace wearable tech

17 January 2014

News: surgically implanted chips that feed digital information directly into the brain will supersede wearable technology, according to the co-founder of a leading 3D imaging studio.

WiFi-enabled chips mounted inside the skull will be more effective than today’s devices such as virtual reality headsets and Google Glass, according to Andy Millns, co-founder of London studio Inition.

“A much more successful way of doing this would be to bypass the eye altogether and directly interface with the brain,” Millns said in an interview with Dezeen. “We’re already seeing things like this with cochlear implants [electronic hearing implants] on the hearing side.” Read more on Inition co-founder Millns: ‘Cyborg scenario’ will see computers in the brain replace wearable tech…

Posted in Presence in the News | Leave a comment

Call: Autonomy & Automation: Robotics, AI and the Digital Cultural Future (DCRC Seminar)

A Call for Papers/Presentations

DCRC presents: Autonomy & Automation: Robotics, AI and the Digital Cultural Future
A One Day Seminar at DCRC (Digital Cultures Research Centre, Bristol, UK)
Saturday March 8, 2014
airobotics.dcrc.org.uk

Through a curiously ambivalent wave of media attention, robotics and AI have emerged as major topics for media and cultural research. Accounts of drones and surveillance applications sit alongside promises of beneficial medical and social uses of ‘helpful’ robots and intelligent systems. All symptomatic of an increasing uncertainty around the character of technoscience and the technocultural transformation it hastens onward.

This one day seminar seeks to contribute toward the placing of robotics and AI firmly on the critical agenda via an interdisciplinary approach bringing humanities, science and technology studies into dialogue.

In doing so it will respond to questions around autonomy and automation that robotics and AI developments are posing today in social, cultural, political and military registers. If these questions are not entirely new, the rapid advances in these fields of technoscientific endeavour make it increasingly urgent for us to pose them, not least because what seems to be looming on the horizon is the disappearance of the critical autonomy to interrogate and to reshape the cultural and political adoption of such advances.  Read more on Call: Autonomy & Automation: Robotics, AI and the Digital Cultural Future (DCRC Seminar)…

Posted in Calls | Leave a comment

Alan Watts on happiness and how to live with presence

[A different but arguably very related use of the term presence, from Brain Pickings: “Watts argues that our primary mode of relinquishing presence is by leaving the body and retreating into the mind — that ever-calculating, self-evaluating, seething cauldron of thoughts, predictions, anxieties, judgments, and incessant meta-experiences about experience itself.”]

Alan Watts

An Antidote to the Age of Anxiety: Alan Watts on Happiness and How to Live with Presence

Wisdom on overcoming the greatest human frustration from the pioneer of Eastern philosophy in the West

by Maria Popova

“How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives,” Annie Dillard wrote in her timeless reflection on presence over productivity — a timely antidote to the central anxiety of our productivity-obsessed age. Indeed, my own New Year’s resolution has been to stop measuring my days by degree of productivity and start experiencing them by degree of presence. But what, exactly, makes that possible?

This concept of presence is rooted in Eastern notions of mindfulness — the ability to go through life with crystalline awareness and fully inhabit our experience — largely popularized in the West by British philosopher and writer Alan Watts (January 6, 1915–November 16, 1973), who also gave us this fantastic meditation on the life of purpose. In the altogether excellent 1951 volume The Wisdom of Insecurity: A Message for an Age of Anxiety (public library), Watts argues that the root of our human frustration and daily anxiety is our tendency to live for the future, which is an abstraction. He writes: Read more on Alan Watts on happiness and how to live with presence…

Posted in Presence in the News | Leave a comment

Call: Lund Conference on Games, Interaction, Reasoning, Learning & Semantics: Evolution and Cooperation

Call for Abstracts for the 3rd Lund Conference on
Games, Interaction, Reasoning, Learning & Semantics
(G.I.R.L.S.14@LUND):

Evolution and Cooperation

Lund, Department of Philosophy and Cognitive Science,
April 28-30, 2014
Sponsored by the Lund Research Group on Information and Information Quality (LU-IQ)

Read more on Call: Lund Conference on Games, Interaction, Reasoning, Learning & Semantics: Evolution and Cooperation…

Posted in Calls | Leave a comment

More life-like moral dilemmas in VR show just how utilitarian we really are

[From ScienceDaily]

Train moral dilemma screenshot

Virtual Reality Moral Dilemmas Show Just How Utilitarian We Really Are

Jan. 15, 2014 — “Moral” psychology has traditionally been studied by subjecting individuals to moral dilemmas, that is, hypothetical choices regarding typically dangerous scenarios, but it has rarely been validated “in the field.” This limitation may have led to systematic bias in hypotheses regarding the cognitive bases of moral judgements. A study relying on virtual reality has demonstrated that, in real situations, we might be far more “utilitarian” than believed so far. Read more on More life-like moral dilemmas in VR show just how utilitarian we really are…

Posted in Presence in the News | Leave a comment

Call: IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC 2014)

Call for Papers

Eighth IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing
IEEE ICSC2014

June 16th-18th, 2014, Newport Beach, CA, USA

http://www.ieee-icsc.org/

Sponsored by IEEE Computer Society

The field of Semantic Computing addresses the derivation of semantic information from content and the connection of semantics to knowledge, where “content” may be anything including structured data, video, audio, text, hardware, software, process, etc.

The Eighth IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC 2014) continues to foster the growth of a new research community. The conference builds on the success of the past ICSC conferences as an international forum for researchers and practitioners to present research that advances the state of the art and practice of Semantic Computing, as well as identifying emerging research topics and defining the future of the field. The event is located in Newport Beach, California at Hyatt Regency Newport Beach. The technical program of ICSC 2014 includes workshops, invited keynotes, paper presentations, panel discussions, industrial ‘show and tells’, demonstrations, and more. Submissions of high-quality papers describing mature results or ongoing work are invited.

The main goal of the conference is to foster the dialog between experts in each sub-discipline. Therefore we especially encourage submissions of work that is interesting to multiple areas, such as multimodal approaches. Read more on Call: IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC 2014)…

Posted in Calls | Leave a comment

Levitation technology brings Star Trek holodecks closer to reality

[From GMA News]

Riker entering holodeck

Levitation technology brings Star Trek holodecks closer to reality

By TJ Dimacali, GMA News January 2, 2014

One of the most iconic technologies in the Star Trek universe are its ubiquitous “holodecks”, which use fictional “holomatter” to generate realistic three-dimensional objects that people can interact with.

Now, scientists at the University of Tokyo have invented a way to levitate and manipulate particles in mid-air—essentially paving the way for making holodecks a thing of science fact.

Yoichi Ochiai, Takayuki Hoshi and Jun Rekimoto of the University of Tokyo’s Nagoya Institute of Technology have been able to use sound waves to create “pressure nodes” in the air in which lightweight particles can be suspended and manipulated in three dimensions: [A 2:25 minute demonstration video] Read more on Levitation technology brings Star Trek holodecks closer to reality…

Posted in Presence in the News | Leave a comment
  • Find Researchers

    Use the links below to find researchers listed alphabetically by the first letter of their last name.

    A | B | C | D | E | F| G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

css.php