ISPR Presence News

Monthly Archives: November 2012

Call: International Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications (ACM HotMobile 2013)

The 14th Annual International Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications (ACM HotMobile 2013)

Sponsored by ACM SIGMOBILE

26-27 February, 2013
Jekyll Island, GA, USA

http://www.hotmobile.org/2013/

ACM HotMobile 2013, the 14th International Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications continues the series of highly selective, interactive workshops focused on mobile applications, systems, and environments, as well as their underlying state-of-the-art technologies. HotMobile’s small workshop format makes it ideal for presenting and discussing new directions or controversial approaches. Read more on Call: International Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications (ACM HotMobile 2013)…

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Arthur Nishimoto’s virtual Enterprise at UIC’s CAVE2

[From Medill Reports, where the story includes a 1:02 minute video]

[Image: Arthur Nishimoto (right) gives visitors a virtual reality tour of the starship Enterprise model he’s spent two years creating. Mitch Smith/MEDILL]

Move over, Holodeck

by Mitch Smith
Nov 28, 2012

It’s baby shower day and Arthur Nishimoto’s gift is next.

His pregnant classmate unwraps a gray onesie with a Star Trek logo that matches the one on Nishimoto’s T-shirt. The room full of University of Illinois at Chicago computer science graduate students erupts in laughter.

Spare Nishimoto the jokes about how computer geeks have memorized every line of every science fiction movie. For the last two years, much of his free time went into designing the guts of Star Trek’s starship Enterprise, from the bridge to the transporter room. His design might offer a preview of the future of video games. Read more on Arthur Nishimoto’s virtual Enterprise at UIC’s CAVE2…

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Call: Designing and Evaluating Sociability in Video Games – CHI 2013 Workshop

Designing and Evaluating Sociability in Video Games

Workshop at the ACM CHI 2013 Conference
April 28, 2013 in Paris, France

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: January 4th, 2013

http://hcigames.businessandit.uoit.ca/chi2013-sociabilitygames/

This one-day workshop will take place at ACM CHI 2013.

OVERVIEW

Computer games are at the forefront of technological innovation; their popularity in research continuously increasing. Their wide presence and use makes computer games a major factor affecting the way people socialize, learn and possibly work.

As increasingly more people become involved with computer games, researchers need to address various questions on topics as diverse as social impact, ethical questions, design, flow, presence, and game experience. This workshop will focus on bringing together researchers and practitioners from various disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, computer science, human-computer interaction, psychology and others, to discuss how to design and evaluate the social structures that make online video games so appealing.

This workshop aims to create a framework that will be applicable to the game design industry, and that will provide principles, guidelines, methods, and metrics for the design and evaluation of social structures in online video games. Read more on Call: Designing and Evaluating Sociability in Video Games – CHI 2013 Workshop…

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Red Hill Studios releases ‘Be There: Yosemite’ VR iPad/iPhone app

[From Red Hill Studios via PRNewswire]

Red Hill Studios Releases ‘Be There: Yosemite’

Innovative Mobile VR iPad/iPhone App

SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 28, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Award-winning mobile app developer Red Hill Studios announces the release of Be There: Yosemite, the second in a series of innovative ‘mobile virtual reality’ apps that let you explore famous locations as if you were standing right there – viewing the scene. With Red Hill’s proprietary Panopticon™ technology, this revolutionary app reads the gyroscopes on the iPad/iPhone and updates the view in perfect sync with your movements. Immersive soundscapes featuring the native birds and animals complete the mobile VR experience. Read more on Red Hill Studios releases ‘Be There: Yosemite’ VR iPad/iPhone app…

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Call: 2013 Rutgers Media Studies Conference: Extending Play

Call for Papers: 2013 Rutgers Media Studies Conference: Extending Play

Can we still define play as an organizing principle in today’s technologically mediated world?

Play can be hard work and serious business, and it’s time to push beyond the conceptualization of play as merely the pursuit of leisure and consider how the issues of power, affect, labor, identity, and privacy surround the idea and practice of play. The Rutgers Media Studies Conference: Extending Play invites submissions that seek to understand play as a mediating practice, and how play operates at the center of all media.

We are interested in all approaches to the traditions, roles, and contexts of play, and hope to explore how play can be broadly defined and incorporated as a fundamental principle extending into far-flung and unexpected arenas. Johan Huizinga characterizes man as the species that plays: “Law and order, commerce and profit, craft and art, poetry, wisdom and science. All are rooted in the primaeval soil of play” (Homo Ludens, p.5). How does play operate as a civilizing function — or is it perhaps a technology that produces order?

Play is a means of exploring and joining various disciplines: Social media, mash-ups, and blogs have altered how we communicate and create; game design has influenced how businesses relate to consumers; citizen journalists have shifted the role of the professional in mediating information and forging a public sphere.

To explore these questions, we invite scholars, students, tinkerers, visionaries, and players to the first ever Rutgers Media Studies Conference: Extending Play, to be held April 19th and 20th, 2013 on the Rutgers University campus in New Brunswick, NJ. Confirmed speakers for our keynote conversations include Fred Turner (Stanford University) & Stephen Duncombe (New York University) and Trevor Pinch (Cornell University) & Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky (The European Graduate School). Read more on Call: 2013 Rutgers Media Studies Conference: Extending Play…

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3D Visualization Service provides realistic, immersive virtual aircraft environment

[From Aviation International News; the 3DVisualisation Service web site is here]

[Image: 3DVisualization Service president J.P. Mangano shows off the company’s virtual reality headset, which customers can use to walk through the interior of their aircraft before it is completed.]

3D Visualization Service Provides Virtual Aircraft Environment

by Curt Epstein
October 31, 2012

While most of the aircraft builders at NBAA [National Business Aviation Association] build their products out of tons of aluminum or increasingly carbon fiber, one new exhibitor here builds them out of thin air. 3DVisualization Service is demonstrating its technology (Booth no. 2885), which allows customers to create a virtual aircraft and enables people to actually walk through it, long before the first metal is ever cut.

Once you place the virtual reality headset over your face, you are transported into a surprisingly realistic virtual environment. The level of detail is stunning, right down to the weave of the carpet. A newspaper rests on a table along with a pen and a smartphone. Across the aisle another table is set for meal service. A glance out a cabin window reveals clouds slowly drifting past in a blue sky. As you walk over and sit in a real chair, your virtual perspective changes as if you were settling into a plush leather club seat. Indeed a full cabin could be laid out with actual furniture acting as place holders for what the user is experiencing as they stroll through the cabin. Read more on 3D Visualization Service provides realistic, immersive virtual aircraft environment…

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Call: Game Jam at CHI ’13

Call for Participation
Game Jam at CHI 2013
Paris, France, April 27 – 28 : 9:00am – 6:00pm

Deadline for submissions is January 11th, 2013
Website: http://exertiongameslab.org/workshops-events/chi-2013-game-jam
Contact: alan@exertiongameslab.org

Game Jams – energized, fast-paced get-togethers of developers and artists to make digital games – have emerged as a way to generate and provoke novel game ideas. To introduce the HCI community to this collaborative fast-paced approach to quick results, we will be holding a 2-day Game Jam that focuses on new physical interfaces. During this hands-on workshop, participants will collaborate with other researchers and practitioners across the CHI community to build games with novel physical interfaces. The workshop has three goals:

  • Develop insights into the nature of digital play interactions through actively designing them
  • Develop long-term cross-disciplinary relationships between participants
  • Expose participants to the game jam design method

At the end of the workshop, we will share the games developed with the CHI community to fuel a greater discussion about games, play interaction, and rapid development methods. Read more on Call: Game Jam at CHI ’13…

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His sketching robots saved his sanity and tell us how we relate emotionally to machines

[From Slate, where the story includes a 4:21 minute video; more information including images and another video are available from the web site of The MERGE Festival]

How Robots Saved an Artist’s Sanity

The greatest artist of his generation is named Paul.

By Torie Bosch | Posted Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012

For much of his life, Patrick Tresset has been torn between art and technology. The child of an artist and an engineer, Tresset dabbled in both during his youth in France and enjoyed tinkering with the “primitive” computer his family got when he was 10. In college, he eschewed art in favor of studying business computing. After graduating, however, he “found it boring” and pivoted back to art—painting, in particular.

For the next decade, Tresset tried to make it as a painter. Occasionally, he was successful, exhibiting his work in Paris and London. But “along the way, I kind of lost touch with reality. … I kind of lost my ability to function in society,” he said last weekend at a press conference at Ciudad de las Ideas, an annual gathering about big ideas held in Puebla, Mexico, and sponsored by Grupo Salinas.

In his 30s, Tresset made the admirable and difficult decision to seek treatment for his mental health problems—and for him, medication and therapy worked. There was just one problem. “I was able to function again … but I lost my passion for art, for doing things by hand,” he said.

The connection between creativity and mental illness is complicated and has received a lot of attention—for instance, in Kay Redfield Jamison’s excellent Touched With Fire: Manic-Depressive Illness and the Artistic Temperament, published in 1993. Jamison writes in the introduction:

“[T]here is some evidence that as a group, artists and writers disproportionately seek out psychiatric care; certainly many—including Byron, Schumann, Tennyson, Fitzgerald, and Lowell—repeatedly sought help from their physicians. Other writers and artists stop taking their medications because they miss the highs or the emotional intensity associated with their illness, or because they feel the drug side effects interfere with the clarity and rapidity of their thought or diminish their levels of enthusiasm, emotion, and energy.”

The latter group seems to be the one that receives more attention—indeed, society seems to revere the mentally ill artist, seeing her as sacrificing her sanity for the greater good. If van Gogh had been healthy, this narrative goes, maybe he wouldn’t have produced such masterpieces.

Tresset, for one, discovered a novel way to stay mentally healthy with the help of drugs and still pursue what was once his life’s work: He created robots that can draw portraits. Far from a mere novelty, his research is telling us more about both the creative process in humans and how we relate emotionally to machines. Read more on His sketching robots saved his sanity and tell us how we relate emotionally to machines…

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Call: Free King’s College London event Nov. 28 – The Virtual Object and Haptic Interfaces

An Art, Science and Technology Seminar, co-organised by the Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London and the Centre for Creative Collaborations, with the support of King’s College London Public Engagement

THE VIRTUAL OBJECT AND HAPTIC INTERFACES

When: Wednesday, 28th November 2012, 2PM
Where: Centre for Creative Collaboration (C4CC), 16 Acton Street, London
WC1X 9NG http://www.creativecollaboration.org.uk/where.php

With me, Dr Anna Bentkowska-Kafel, Lecturer in Digital Art History, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London and Dr David Prytherch, a glass sculptor and Senior Research Fellow in Haptics and Computer Interfaces, User-lab, Birmingham Institute of Art & Design, Birmingham City University

How real is a virtual object? We will discuss recent developments in haptic computing and its potential for simulating touch experiences of virtual artefacts, particularly museum and heritage objects. The seminar is an opportunity to experience a haptic device first hand in order to enhance a critical understanding of human and machine haptics and the perceptual processes involved. Read more on Call: Free King’s College London event Nov. 28 – The Virtual Object and Haptic Interfaces…

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Change the size of food and your appetite with AR system from Tokyo U.

[From Diginfo TV]

Change the size of food and your appetite with AR system from Tokyo U.

2 November 2012
Posted By Don Kennedy and Ryo Osuga

At the University of Tokyo, the Hirose Tanikawa Group has developed an AR system that can manipulate the user’s feeling of having eaten enough, by changing how big the food appears.

This system features a head-mount display with a camera, and uses image processing to make food look bigger than it actually is. The size of the food in the hands can be changed in real time, while keeping the size of the hands constant. The system creates a natural image by using a deformation algorithm, to alter the shape of the hands in line with the size of the food. Read more on Change the size of food and your appetite with AR system from Tokyo U….

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